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The Stuph File Program – Episode #0478

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0478.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Critical Importance of Storytelling On The Radio

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Pop Quiz: What’s the most important skill a radio personality can have? Is it a great voice? A pleasant personality? A smooth way of talking up song ramps?

It’s none of those things. It’s the ability to tell stories. Storytelling is at the very core of the difference between announcers and true personalities that command attention on the air.

Fortunately, there are some basics any personality can learn and apply to tell better stories. There’s an art to relating a personal experiences on the air. But every art is governed by some principles and laws. There’s also a science to storytelling. The science is in the structure of a story. There are 5 storytelling steps, and each is important in crafting a great break on the air.

Some personalities are naturally great storytellers. They have a gift for making the listener feel special. Others (most) have to work on it.

Mastering, or at least understanding, the 5 Steps of Storytelling will improve your communication and connection skills, on the air and off. It will also tighten and sharpen the show’s performance because you’ll realize the importance of deeper show prep.

Let’s examine and demonstrate each of the 5 Steps of Storytelling.

5 Storytelling Steps Defined

Here’s a short summary of each step of a well-told on-air story: The hook, set up, dress up, payoff and black out.

Step 1: Hook

A magazine attracts attention to a story by the headline. Their headline is the hook. On magazine covers, the headline is designed for one purpose. It’s to provoke curiosity so the shopper picks it up and turns to the story. That’s it. It’s the same on the air. The hook’s sole function is to get interest in what will follow.

Hooks have to be quick. You have 7 seconds to get the hook in and lure the audience deeper into content. The hook should rarely be about you, but rather to set up a story that supports the hook.

The hook is the most important part of your story. If you don’t capture attention in the opening line(s), listeners will be gone by the time it gets “good”.

Step 2: Set Up

In the magazine metaphor, the set up is the first paragraph of the story. Once you open the magazine to the right page, the setup lures you into the rest of the article. On the air the Set Up should advance the story and frame the details that lead the audience onward.

The second step of storytelling is really the first step toward Pay Off.

Personal stories, main characters and conflict happens in the Set Up. Think of it as a bridge from the opening line to the twists and turns that build interest toward the thrilling conclusion.

A set up should have enough detail to move the story forward. In most cases, such as in the Jeff & Jer segment below, a personal story works best in the set up phase, particularly if listener participation is coming later.

Step 3: Dress Up

In this step, the break accelerates toward payoff.

How will you embellish, exaggerate and enhance the content? Turn up the volume on the story during the Dress Up step.

Adding detail, color and twists and turns is important in this phase. But every element must move the story toward the conclusion.

A lot can, and often does, go wrong in this step. The wrong details can become a detour or dead end. This usually happens because personalities fail to plan this part of the story.

Step 4: Pay Off

There are two critical elements in getting to the Pay Off. The first is building anticipation by increasing suspense. The second is protecting the outcome so the Pay Off is surprising.

Every break needs a destination.

Before the story begins, plan the outcome. In fact, this is where you should target the bulk of show prep time. It’s much easier to perform spontaneously when you know where a break is going.

Some bits don’t have a natural punchline, including the example below. That’s okay, as long as there’s a direction and a plan for getting out efficiently.

Step 5: Black Out

Once it’s over, it’s over. 

Many great breaks are ruined when talent goes for one more punchline. That one extra joke or one more phone call can turn a good break into an ordeal. It’s always better to find an exit and take it rather than hoping for another out that doesn’t come.

Conclusion

Storytelling structure is a fundamental element of radio performance. Personalities should use the 5 storytelling steps in every break. In Show Prep, start with the Pay Off. Identify how you want the break to end. Then develop a great Hook. With those elements in place, the Set Up and Dress Up are much easier.

Some segments will have a longer Set Up or Dress Up than others. Experiment with the 5 storytelling steps in your show prep process to find your sweet spot. As you learn to master the break structure, it will et easier and easier.

This is just a sample of the storytelling principles I share in my new online seminar, STORYTELLING BASICS. The webinar is October 9 at 1pm EST. Sign Up for the free seminar here.  The seminar is also available on demand after October 9 here.

 

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0477

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0477.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:


  • Mary Winchenbach, creator, Tirdy Works
  • Dr. John Huber, clincal forensic psychologist — lawnmower parents
  • Lee Jenkins, author, Permission to Forget

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

Are You Punching Listeners In The Face?

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When you think about it, many air personalities are rude. In the interest of brevity, we rush into content to get off to a quick start. And when we reach a high point, we suddenly bail on the break. Those are important principles. But not if it comes at the expense of being warm, friendly human beings. There’s an art in knowing how to shake hands on the air. And saying goodbye.

Randy Chase programs K-LOVE and AIR 1. He coaches his talent to find the right balance by teaching this principle:

Did you shake their hand or punch them in the face?

What It Means To Shake Hands On The Air

Imagine you’re a party. You walk up to a group of people engaged in a conversation and interrupt by launching a story:

Guys drive me crazy because they never listen.

Okay. That’s a pretty strong hook. Then you proceed to tell your personal story to develop your topic.

You’ve disturbed their mood by inserting your personality into their circle. They’re overwhelmed, and probably think you’re rude. It’s like walking up to the group and punching them in the face.

You didn’t shake hands to enter the conversation. Now, you’re thinking about the 7-second challenge. It’s true that it’s important to gain attention immediately or risk losing it. But we’re sacrificing human connection by rushing into content.

When launching a break, imagine the audience in an active conversation. They may be singing along with a song you’re playing or interested in the newscast that was on. Or, they could be going over their kid’s homework on the way to school.

When you turn on the microphone, you’re inserting personality into their world.

PPM Is Making Us Rude

Our reaction to the ratings system is part of the problem. PPM programming philosophy is to remove everything that doesn’t have to be there. We make it efficient, but it’s no longer human.

We’re PPMing personality to death. Blurting out content isn’t being tight or focused. Being tight is about not wasting time or boring the listener. It’s not about getting it on and gone as fast as possible. Those short spurts of interruptive talk is rude.

Ending The Story and Walking Away

The other end of the break is also a problem. Talent is so focused on taking the first exit, they often miss great moments. And they leave the audience wondering why they stopped talking and walked away. You still need to shake hands on the air when you say goodbye at the end of the break. It’s polite.

I hear so many breaks that end on a high point, but leave the story unfinished. That’s fine if the content is crafted into a story arc and is teased to the next break. But it’s not about getting out on the first exit. It’s getting out on the best exit.

It’s like telling a story, making them laugh, then turning and leaving the room.

Programmer Matt Cleveland at Bell Media’s cluster in Fredricton, New Brunswick says,

Getting out on the first high point is the new talk up the intro of the song and nail the post. It doesn’t matter. It is celebrated only by the jock on the air.

It’s like Seinfeld’s George Costanza walking out after delivering a good line.

Get out at the right time, and use it to build momentum. Make that group of people beg you to stay and tell more stories. If the audience is engaged, take advantage of that peak to build forward momentum on the show.

Conclusion

Being tight, focused and efficient are great disciplines for personalities. But don’t be so focused on short that personal connection is lost. Think about ways you can shake hands on the air.

There are many ways to inject personality and friendly comments into a show. I call it “ize-ing” your personality. Use those to your advantage.

As an air talent, try to avoid punching listeners in the face and walking away without saying goodbye.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0476

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0476.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:


  • Anthony Del Col, comic book creator, Luke Cage: Everyman
  • Larry Gifford, broadcaster, When Life Gives You Parkinson’s Podcast
  • Frank Kermit, relationship coach — dating & sex

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0475

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0474.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0474

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0474.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

How To Host A Radio Party

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Everyone loves a party. It’s a celebration. It’s fun. And if it’s done right, guests can’t wait for the next party. But did you ever host a party? I’m sure you have. Hosting the party isn’t nearly as glamorous as going to a party.

It’s a lot of work to host a party. A great party is directly related to the amount of time and effort the host puts into planning the details and promoting – yes, promoting – the party to guests.

How to Host a Party

The list of tasks for a successful party is endless. From the planning stages of create a guest list to cleaning up after the party, it’s a big job. For example, to host a party, you have to:

Plan the theme.

Prepare the room.

Decorate.

Put together the playlist.

Send the invitations.

Hire a caterer.

Handle RSVPs.

Follow up with those who don’t respond.

Call and remind guests as the date gets nearer.

Then, guests have to know what to expect. What time does it start? When does it end? Is there dinner? Or appetizers? What should I wear? Can I bring a guest? Is there a charge for the drinks? What should I bring? Who else will be there? Who is it for? How do I get there? Where do I park? Where do I hang my coat?

When the party starts, the host has to make sure everyone is looked after. The host must insure guests  feel welcome and included by making introductions and facilitating conversations.

At the end of the evening, the host arranges for rides home for those who may have had a bit too much to drink. And often, they send them off with a gift bag to put a finishing touch on a great evening.

And when everyone finally leaves, guess who gets to clean up?

Your Radio Show Is a Daily Party

A radio show is a party that takes place on the air each day. The question is whether or not it’s a party listeners will tell their friends about…and want to come back.

Let’s go over some of the details it takes to host a party on the air.

Invitations

Do listeners feel welcome to come to the party? Do you build anticipation with specific, direct messaging so they know what to expect? When they tune in to the party, is it clear what the party is about and who it’s for? Or do they feel lost and confused?

Have you told them exactly when and where to listen? This happens both on and off the air. Use all tools available, including email, social media and promos.

When did the last email go the audience database? Were details included about the highlights for tomorrow’s party? Did you tweet them? Text them?

Is there a guide to the show on the station’s web site with updated information so listeners can come to the party?

Entertainment

Fun doesn’t just happen at a party or on the air. It’s the result of careful planning and preparation. You can’t throw a party, invite a few people and hope for something good to happen. You have to set up the entertainment to match your theme and excite your guests.

How is the content targeted to fit the guest’s mood? Does it makes sense to them? Is it appropriate? Is it appealing to those on the guest list? In other words, do you curate content, turning topics into stories that resonate with the target audience.

A great host builds a party’s schedule around one main thing that stands out above all others. What is the highlight of the party that guests will talk about tomorrow? Will something happen at the party to make it memorable? Are you staging your show in a way that points listeners to one key moment, then staging it in a way that helps listeners actually remember it?

A great host arranges entertainment that makes guests feel involved, but doesn’t rely on the guests to provide the entertainment. On the radio, are the breaks entertaining on their own, or are you just throwing out a phone topic and hoping the audience has something interesting to say?

Decorations

Little things make a big difference at a party. Decorations don’t make the party successful, but they add ambiance that enhances the experience. Are you using on-air decorations effectively?

Does the production match the theme of the party?  Have you taken care of little things like music beds and production effects that set the tone? Does it accent the party or does it overwhelm in an obnoxious way?

RSVPs

The invitations have been sent, but that doesn’t mean anyone will show up. Just because a promo aired for a feature that airs at 7:20 doesn’t mean listeners are coming for it.

A party host has to follow up on the invitation. Once appointment tune in events are set, it’s important to constantly remind them that the party is happening. Guests have other things they could be doing.

Don’t expect them to RSVP on their own. Build a plan to follow up and chase them down. Create a plan to make sure listeners come to the party!

Hosting

Remember that the party is not for you. It’s for guests. A host’s job is to provide a great experience. Do this well and guests will love the host for it. They’ll tell their friends about it. And they’ll look forward to the next party, which happens to be tomorrow.

Great hosts don’t spend their time talking about themselves. Do that and one by one, all guests will leave. Nobody wants to be around self-absorbed party hosts.

Clean Up:

As soon as the party is over, clean up begins. It’s time to pick up the pieces and start planning the next one. The process starts over, with new invitations.

But before the invitations go out for tomorrow’s party, it’s a good idea to review today’s show and consider how the next one can be better.

Conclusion

Your guests’ (audience) enthusiasm for your event (show) will only be as great as your attention to planning (preparation) and detail (execution).

It’s a lot of work to insure an event is a success. Don’t take it for granted and expect them to just “find” you.

BURLI AND CRAIG POWER, ACADIA BROADCASTING

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One of the most satisfying parts of working with Burli Software is the knowledge that our customers tend to stay with us for a long time. Loyalty is important to us, and it goes both ways!

Take radio reporter Craig Power, with the team at Acadia Broadcasting. He’s the morning news anchor and reporter at CKBW in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, having also been in the business for years with Bayshore Broadcasting, Blackburn Radio, Bell Media, and Astral Media, in radio stations all over Canada.

He’s used multiple newsroom systems over the years, but plainly Burli Newsroom has proven his favourite.

One Stop Shop

“It’s my everything,” says Craig when asked to describe what Burli means to him. For what I need to do on a day to day basis, Burli does it”, he said.

Craig needs it to do a lot. He not only reads the news on-air for South Shore Radio, he’s also his own reporter, venturing frequently into the field to unearth the local news that matters so very much to the community he serves.

Personally, I feel Burli is the only software for what I do for a living. ~ Craig Power, Acadia Broadcasting

He’s fond of using the remote upload tools in Burli to take the audio he gathers in the field and drop it directly into the editing environment.  Turning interviews into compelling stories is simple using Burli’s single editing interface, Craig says.

Working With Burli

Having everything on one screen is “a blessing”, Craig said.  He makes good use of the ability to bring in his text and audio from multiple sources and edit it in one, single screen, calling it “fast [and] efficient”.

 

As a former audio engineer, he is particularly enthusiastic about Burli’s multi-track audio tools.  While in the field, he likes to grab ambient sounds with his iPhone (bagpipes, he jokes, make a good background track on many stories), upload the audio from the field, and employ that audio directly in Burli, underneath his story.  The multi-track editor makes this process simple and fast.

He remembers when the principal way to get audio into an editorial system was playing it from a field recorder over some kind of cable. Burli’s upload and drag-and-drop tools are much easier to work with.

Plus, he notes, the audio editor itself has just the right number of tools that a reporter needs to do the job – it’s not filled with endless extra features you’ll never use.  “It’s meant to get something edited… on the fly, inserted into a script, on the air,” he says, perfect for his use.  He likes to top and tail, adjust levels, and insert ambient sound quickly and easily.  “Everything I’m using is what I need”.

Stacking Up
Craig notes with a laugh that he has used other newsroom systems.  In one non-Burli newsroom, he says, one of the other on-air staff confided she’d been using the software for three years, and she
still hadn’t figured it out.

Burli, Craig says, removes many redundancies and extra steps other systems impose.  Multiply those extra steps dozens or hundreds of times a day, and the work quickly becomes “tedious”.

He was very happy to be back with Burli in his next location. “Personally, I feel Burli is the only software for what I do for a living”.

Loyal Customers
Burli Software is excited to work with customers like Craig, whose enthusiasm is contagious when he describes his line of work.  That he’s equally excited about the tools involved in that work is a great compliment, one we work hard to earn.

We’d like to thank Acadia Broadcasting, CJHK, CKBW, and Craig for their business and support of Burli!

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0473

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0473.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0472

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0472.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

A Winning Personality Formula: TSP = TSL

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Memorize this show prep formula and remind yourself of it every day: TSP = TSL.

The amount of time spent preparing is directly related to the amount of time spent listening. It’s not the only factor, but it’s a major contributing factor.

Most personalities will read this and think the solution is spending more time gathering topics. But just finding things to talk about is the easy part. I’m talking about deeper preparation that transforms content from topics to entertainment.

Master chefs spend time selecting ingredients to be used in a recipe. Finding the freshest vegetables and most desirable cuts of meat are the foundation of his masterpiece.

But most of the time and attention is on what he or she does with the ingredients. How will they be cooked? What is the perfect combination of spices to accent the individual tastes and textures? Should it be sautéed, broiled, baked or fried? How will it be presented? What side dishes and wine pairings will turn dining into an experience?

Mastering the fine art of performance takes time to perfect.

Show Prep Formula Perspective

Dan Wylie is the VP of Programming for Canada’s Blackburn Radio. He shared a remarkable comparison that emphasizes the importance of preparation, and the commitment it takes to excel on the air. Dan told me:

The average NFL football game lasts 3.5 hours, but there’s only about 12 minutes of actual action in each game.

Most of the game time is spent planning, preparing, organizing and adjusting to current circumstances. Things like huddles, time-outs and adjustments at the line of scrimmage makes up over 95% of the game.

That’s just the game itself. NFL players spend the rest of the week reviewing their performance. They analyze competition, learn new plays and prepare a game plan. The off-season is spent conditioning, training and keeping themselves in peak condition for next year.

Show Prep Formula: The NFL Way

The quarterback comes out of the huddle. He looks over the defense, and as the seconds on the play clock tick down to :00, a frantic series of adjustments at the line of scrimmage looks more like a fire drill than a well-oiled machine.

Blocking assignments are altered, pass routes changed. Everything about the plan has changed. Sometimes it looks like they’re making it up as they go along.

Watching quarterbacks in the NFL is a great lesson in the art of creating a morning show. They make last-second decisions. But those decisions are the result of deep preparation for every possibility.

Quarterbacks spend countless hours learning the playbook and knowing the assignment for every player on the team. Then he spends about 60 hours each week watching video of the opponent, studying tendencies and looking for clues that give him an edge.

The coaching staff prepares a game plan. A play is called in the huddle. Everyone on the team knows what is about to happen. Then, everything changes when it’s time to execute.

Changes are made based on a deep knowledge of team strengths and weaknesses, opponent’s vulnerabilities and the situation in the game. but those changes are always made based on the team’s playbook, game plan and coaching direction.

Aaron Rodgers on Show Prep

Here’s MVP Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers on the keys to winning the Super Bowl:

The key is to be able to focus on preparation. You can’t let the distractions take you away from what you need to do next. You need to show up prepared to play, expect the unexpected, and know exactly what you are going to do.

Going into the game mentally prepared helps Rodgers know exactly what plays to run, and which audible to call against each defense. When the mind is prepared, the rest is just execution and muscle memory.

And that takes time. There’s no substitute.

Visualize It

Visualization is the ability to create clear, detailed and accurate images in your mind of events that you want to create as physical reality. There are visual triggers that help quarterbacks recognize which type of defense he should expect.

We often hear talent claim their best shows are spontaneous, just “living my life on the air.” I’ve actually heard personalities say, “Don’t talk about that now. Save it for the air.” More often than not, they start their show without the tools to succeed. They haven’t prepared.

Quarterbacks don’t design new plays in the huddle. They don’t run plays that haven’t been rehearsed. They plan every detail to give them the best chance to win.

It’s true that the best moments on the air are spontaneous, just as the difference between winning and losing is the result of instant decisions on the field. But spontaneity is the product of preparing for every possible outcome. This provides the background to react when unexpected circumstances arise.

Show Prep Formula & Your 12 Minutes of Content

Most personalities are on the air between 3-5 hours per day. The average for a personality oriented morning show, coincidentally, is 3.5 hours. Just like an NFL game. On a typical music station, it’s common for a show to execute four breaks per hour, each about 3-4 minutes, or around 12 minutes of content per hour. That doesn’t seem like much, does it?

But to make it great, you must invest the time.

Rachel Ettiger is half of the morning show Jeff (Kelly) and Rachel on Virgin Radio/London, Ontario.

Rachel is one of the best I’ve ever heard in presenting Entertainment Reports. But it doesn’t happen by ripping and reading the latest headlines and hoping for the best.

I love what Rachel told me about show prep:

It takes about two hours a day to prepare the Hollywood information, understand it, digest it and know it so I can just tell it without sounding like I’m reading it. It’s a lot of work to sound spontaneous and fresh.

Conclusion

How much time and effort goes into your show? Do you have a show prep formula?

Like a professional athlete your show should be in a constant state of preparation planning and adjustment. Train yourself to be alert for content that applies to your show. Obsess about how your content will be presented. Plan your entry point for maximum impact.

Every day is game day. You can’t win by making it up as you go along.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0471

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0471.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:


  • Paul D. Marks, author, Broken Windows
  • Sandi Harding, general manager, Blockbuster Video
  • Peter Franklin, Gabby Cabby

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0470

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0470.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:


  • Andrew Fazeks, science writer — The Parker Solar Probe
  • James Cridland, radio futurologist, — radio & podcasts
  • Stuart Nulman, Book Banter

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.

The Stuph File Program – Episode #0469

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Stuph File Program.

For a program list of the items included and all their accompanying links in this one hour show, you can find the information on my website in the Stuph File Program section, or just follow this link to #0469.



To download the podcast, right click here and select “Save Link As”

Featured in this episode:

Click logo for iTunes podcast subscription If you have any comments or suggestions, or items for the mailbag, feel free to click on the “Comments” link below to add your thoughts.