Internet Free Streaming Days Are Gone
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 1 year ago 1 post

Under new regulations, internet-only radio will be charged more for rights to play music. (Carolyn Duff / The DePaulia)
This past December the Copyright Royalty Board, the group responsible for overseeing copyrights and royalty payments through the Library of Congress, announced new rates for music played via the Internet. To be clear, this impacts online-only radio stations, not FM and AM radio, or satellite radio.

The new law significantly increases the cost a station pays each time a song is played. In the world of streaming and Internet radio, having more listeners is not always a good thing. The more people tuning in, the more money the station owes.

The discussion of how musical artists are compensated for music played digitally has become an increasingly visible topic. Last year artists such as Taylor Swift and Adele made headlines for holding out on streaming services that some argue do not pay artists enough.

The extra money from Internet stations may be a nice boost to the artists receiving airplay, but consider some of the groups that will have to foot the bill.

Radio DePaul, the university’s Internet only radio station, is not spared from the increase. Unlike some other local colleges or high schools with an FM radio station, Radio DePaul operates solely online, and therefore receives no special or educational licensing from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

“We are an educational college station, even though that’s not official,” Radio DePaul faculty advisor Scott Vyverman said. “The FCC doesn’t recognize or oversee streaming radio, educational or otherwise. While we know who we are and why DePaul supports our operation and further know that we shouldn’t be held to the same copyright fee rates as Pandora, the Copyright Royalty Board has seen fit to lump us together. If we had a license, we would navigate and deal with this differently.”

One step the station could take would be to reduce the amount of music played on the station, though that would fundamentally alter the content. The other option would be to consider fundraising tactics. Vyverman hopes to take neither road.

“Focusing more on fundraising would not be something that I would welcome. It would fundamentally change who we are. We will cross that bridge if we have to, but for now, we are looking to deal with the hand we’ve been dealt,” he said.

Beyond the implications the new copyright laws may have on the university’s radio station, the new laws ultimately are a burden to those seeking content that cannot be found elsewhere.

Internet radio has offered listeners some salvation from commercial radio. Niche formats have been able to find small, active communities online where artists can continue to receive airplay and reach fans.

Veteran Chicago program director and DJ Rick O’Dell operated an Internet-based smooth jazz radio station for three years after the format was left without a home on Chicago radio. O’Dell filled the void for listeners until shutting the station down on Jan. 1, when the increased rates went into effect.

But it is not so much an “us” versus “them” mentality between broadcasters and artists.

“The law isn’t counterproductive, because artists deserve compensation,” O’Dell said. “Internet broadcasters who were running their businesses as a serious, legitimate enterprise appreciate that artists deserve to be paid.”

“In many ways I preferred to see those dollars go into an artist’s pocket as opposed to a faceless corporation.  The new royalty increases weren’t equitably applied.  That’s the problem I have with it, not the fact that I have to pay royalties in the first place,” said O’Dell.

Unfortunately, it can be a double-edged sword. Artists can only receive royalties if someone is listening to their music via an online station. An online station can only operate and play the music if it can afford to.

It is in the Internet broadcasters’ best interests to no longer do it alone. Instead of operating as independent entities, some organization on the part of Internet stations could go a long way in influencing future changes.

“If Internet broadcasters had been better organized, we at least could have had a seat at the table,” O’Dell said. “As it was, we weren’t represented at all.  That’s not the fault of the FCC or CRB.  That’s our fault.  You can’t influence the results of the game if you’re not in the game.”

Without representation or organization, the Internet radio industry will continue to have to abide by laws in which they had no say in crafting.

For stations like Radio DePaul, there is some hope that other educational based outlets could join forces.

“Thankfully we have the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System on our side. They are fighting the good fight for us and I hope that they will continue to appeal and argue on behalf of all college stations, especially the streaming-only stations,” Vyverman said.

Otherwise, voices and content lacking representation on traditional radio risk being silenced by the new payment

Niagara College Broadcasting Students Win National Awards
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 7 months, 3 weeks ago 1 post

By NEWSTALK 610 CKTB

Just weeks before graduating from Niagara College’s three-year Broadcasting – Radio, Television and Film program, Rachel Hodges along with Brandon Primmer were each honoured with a National Student Award from the Broadcast Educators Association of Canada.

The BEAC awards recognize the unique combination of creativity and technical excellence demonstrated by students in radio, television, video and new media.

Welland residents Primmer and Hodges both won the awards for work they completed as part of their studies: Primmer in the video category for his music video, “Let Yourself Go,” and Hodges in the audio category for her newscast that aired live in December on NC’s student radio station, CRNC The Heat.

Primmer, who is originally from Owen Sound, created the music video for his film production class.

He currently works as a videographer in Hamilton for AMV Productions and hopes to run his own production company someday specializing in music and corporate videos or commercials.

Hodges, who is originally from Orillia, said she was grateful for the award and the experience she gained in all three streams of the College’s Broadcasting program – radio, television and film.

“It has always been my goal to work in the news industry so being able to add a national news award to my resume will certainly be beneficial in the future,” said Hodges, who is currently putting her education to work in the field as an intern reporter at 610 CKTB. “It will help me stand out among a number of other talented and qualified applicants which is important in such a small and competitive industry.”

At the end of May, the students were accompanied to Halifax by BRTF professors Bruce Gilbert and Peter VandenBerg to receive their awards.

“Seeing our students win national awards reinforces that our Broadcasting – Radio, Television and Film program produces high-quality grads that leave with the tools necessary to get great jobs,” said Gilbert. “It was a privilege to represent Niagara College that night.”

Corus Shuffles Its Deck, Reorganizes
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 8 months, 3 weeks ago 1 post

Corus Entertainment has given birth to a new combined structure following the integration of Shaw Media into its fold.

Under the reorg the media and entertainment company has developed five teams to lead its sales, marketing, content, international and communications work.

The client marketing team will be led, as earlier announced, by Barb McKergow. A team of seven people will report to McKergow, with Lynn Chambers, former VP of content marketing slipping into a newly created role as senior director, branded entertainment and experience, according to an internal memo obtained by MiC.

Emma Fachini and Mary Lepage both continue in their roles as directors, sales for client marketing.

Bruce Shepherd is moving from his position as senior manager, marketing ventures to manager, regional sales for British Columbia, a role in which he will responsible for agency-facing integrations and sales for the Vancouver market.

Dave Rigby, also formerly a manager for marketing ventures, will take on the same role as Shepherd for Western Canada, including Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Tracy Christopher is in a newly created role as director, digital production and client services. In her previous role she was director, creative and production, broadcast and interactive, client marketing for TV sales.

Trevor Williams retains his position as director of production for branded sales content.

The digital sales team will be led by Brett Pearson and will work in partnership with the overall sales team to develop multiplatform opportunities.

Dean Shoukas and Lyna Sapijonis join the team as senior manager, digital sales. Sapijonis was part of the Shaw Media team in the same position.

Philippe Kleime has been promoted from director of ad opps to director platforms and strategy. In his new role, Kleime is tasked with strategy for a digital roadmap and to oversee digital vendor partnerships.

Whitney Bloom stays in the role of monetization strategist.

Content distribution, which was previously under the leadership of Maria Hale, now goes to Shawn Praskey. Praskey was previously VP for content distribution. A team of four will report to him, with Drew Robinson continuing as director, content distribution and Beate Jack moving from that role into director of affiliate marketing. Hale now leads content and strategy for Global Entertainment.

Corus’ former VP of research has moved into the role of lead for its research and consumer insights division. This division has been providing advertisers with key data based on information from its Audience Intelligence Platform as well as surveys and in-house research conducted by its team.

Most of the team here remains the same, with the exception of David Bennett, who has been given the rank of senior director, digital audience insights and engagement. In his prior role he was in a VP position for audience engagement and development.

The revenue optimization team will be lead by Tammy Baird, with no changes planned at the moment for the revenue team. Those changes may come in early 2017 when the traffic and sales teams are integrated.

Brand and marketing strategy will be led by Susan Shaefer in a new role as SVP, brands and marketing. Shaefer was previously EVP, marketing and corporate communications; she heads a team of five. On her team is Jim Johnson, who moves from the role of VP, payTV and affiliate marketing to VP, marketing global.

While most of the changes involve a staff shuffle from within Corus, the company’s in-house media agency will be led by a Shaw employee. Scott MacLeod, who was previously senior director of marketing, media planning at Shaw Media has stepped into that role.

Byron Garby has been confirmed as general sales manager, national radio, and will report to Gerry Mackrell, VP of sales.

At the local level, sales will be led by Mike Season, who was formerly director of sales, Corus Radio, Vancouver.

Read more: mediaincanada.com/2016/05/11/corus-shuffles-its-deck-reorganizes/#ixzz4AAJ2pKsA

SiriusXM Canada Going Private in $367 Million Deal
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 8 months, 3 weeks ago 1 post

SiriusXM has announced an agreement with SirusXM Canada, where the Canadian satcaster will be going private as its U.S. counterpart increases its stake in the company. The deal is valued at $367 million. The deal will see SiriusXM and controlling shareholder Liberty Media increase its stake in SiriusXM Canada from 37 percent to 70 percent, which gives it approximately 30 percent of its voting shares.

The rest of its equity and voting stakes will be held by Canadian broadcaster Slaight Communications Inc and private equity firm Obelysk Media. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will no longer be a shareholder in Sirius XM Canada following the transaction. According to Reuters, the CBC was SiriusXM Canada's second-largest shareholder.

“This proposed transaction shows SiriusXM's and SiriusXM Canada's commitment to serving the Canadian market with our leading bundle of premium content, much of which will continue to be created in Canada. The existing Canada-led governance structure will be preserved while vastly improving cooperation between the two companies on next generation products and services that will ensure a healthy future for satellite radio in Canada,” said Jim Meyer, SiriusXM CEO. “While the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will cease to be a shareholder in SiriusXM Canada following the transaction, it will continue to support the company as a programming provider.”

SiriusXM expects to contribute approximately $275 million (in U.S. dollars) to facilitate the transaction. Additionally, the licensing and services agreements between SiriusXM and SiriusXM Canada will be renewed and extended upon the consummation of the proposed transaction.

The deal is subject to approval of the SiriusXM Canada shareholders, receipt of Canadian regulatory approvals, and other customary closing conditions. SiriusXM expects the deal to close no later than the end of the fourth quarter of 2016, upon which time SiriusXM Canada will no longer be a publicly traded stock.

- See more at: www.fmqb.com/Article.asp?id=3007467#sthash.hkZHZLKK.dpuf

Internet Free Streaming Days Are Gone
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 1 year ago 1 post

Under new regulations, internet-only radio will be charged more for rights to play music. (Carolyn Duff / The DePaulia)
This past December the Copyright Royalty Board, the group responsible for overseeing copyrights and royalty payments through the Library of Congress, announced new rates for music played via the Internet. To be clear, this impacts online-only radio stations, not FM and AM radio, or satellite radio.

The new law significantly increases the cost a station pays each time a song is played. In the world of streaming and Internet radio, having more listeners is not always a good thing. The more people tuning in, the more money the station owes.

The discussion of how musical artists are compensated for music played digitally has become an increasingly visible topic. Last year artists such as Taylor Swift and Adele made headlines for holding out on streaming services that some argue do not pay artists enough.

The extra money from Internet stations may be a nice boost to the artists receiving airplay, but consider some of the groups that will have to foot the bill.

Radio DePaul, the university’s Internet only radio station, is not spared from the increase. Unlike some other local colleges or high schools with an FM radio station, Radio DePaul operates solely online, and therefore receives no special or educational licensing from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

“We are an educational college station, even though that’s not official,” Radio DePaul faculty advisor Scott Vyverman said. “The FCC doesn’t recognize or oversee streaming radio, educational or otherwise. While we know who we are and why DePaul supports our operation and further know that we shouldn’t be held to the same copyright fee rates as Pandora, the Copyright Royalty Board has seen fit to lump us together. If we had a license, we would navigate and deal with this differently.”

One step the station could take would be to reduce the amount of music played on the station, though that would fundamentally alter the content. The other option would be to consider fundraising tactics. Vyverman hopes to take neither road.

“Focusing more on fundraising would not be something that I would welcome. It would fundamentally change who we are. We will cross that bridge if we have to, but for now, we are looking to deal with the hand we’ve been dealt,” he said.

Beyond the implications the new copyright laws may have on the university’s radio station, the new laws ultimately are a burden to those seeking content that cannot be found elsewhere.

Internet radio has offered listeners some salvation from commercial radio. Niche formats have been able to find small, active communities online where artists can continue to receive airplay and reach fans.

Veteran Chicago program director and DJ Rick O’Dell operated an Internet-based smooth jazz radio station for three years after the format was left without a home on Chicago radio. O’Dell filled the void for listeners until shutting the station down on Jan. 1, when the increased rates went into effect.

But it is not so much an “us” versus “them” mentality between broadcasters and artists.

“The law isn’t counterproductive, because artists deserve compensation,” O’Dell said. “Internet broadcasters who were running their businesses as a serious, legitimate enterprise appreciate that artists deserve to be paid.”

“In many ways I preferred to see those dollars go into an artist’s pocket as opposed to a faceless corporation.  The new royalty increases weren’t equitably applied.  That’s the problem I have with it, not the fact that I have to pay royalties in the first place,” said O’Dell.

Unfortunately, it can be a double-edged sword. Artists can only receive royalties if someone is listening to their music via an online station. An online station can only operate and play the music if it can afford to.

It is in the Internet broadcasters’ best interests to no longer do it alone. Instead of operating as independent entities, some organization on the part of Internet stations could go a long way in influencing future changes.

“If Internet broadcasters had been better organized, we at least could have had a seat at the table,” O’Dell said. “As it was, we weren’t represented at all.  That’s not the fault of the FCC or CRB.  That’s our fault.  You can’t influence the results of the game if you’re not in the game.”

Without representation or organization, the Internet radio industry will continue to have to abide by laws in which they had no say in crafting.

For stations like Radio DePaul, there is some hope that other educational based outlets could join forces.

“Thankfully we have the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System on our side. They are fighting the good fight for us and I hope that they will continue to appeal and argue on behalf of all college stations, especially the streaming-only stations,” Vyverman said.

Otherwise, voices and content lacking representation on traditional radio risk being silenced by the new payment

Jian Ghomeshi
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 1 year ago 1 post

TORONTO – He was a broadcasting star with a wide and loyal following before he became engulfed in a scandal that sparked a nationwide conversation on sexual assault and the issues with reporting it.

Now, more than a year since the allegations against Jian sent shock waves across the country, his highly anticipated trial is set to begin in Toronto on Monday.

Ghomeshi – the former host of CBC radio's popular culture show “Q” – has pleaded not guilty to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

The judge-alone trial, which is expected to last several weeks, involves three complainants and will be closely watched by many across the country.

“Radio is a very intimate medium and he was going into people's living rooms five days a week,” said Marsha Barber, a journalism professor at Toronto's Ryerson University.

“He was very influential and he had a huge listenership. Anybody who listened to him regularly is going to feel that they have a stake in what happened.”

The controversy around Ghomeshi surfaced on Oct. 24, 2014, when the CBC first said he was taking time off from his duties “to deal with some personal issues.” Two days later, the public broadcaster said it had cut ties with the popular host.

In a lengthy Facebook message posted on the same day, Ghomeshi said he'd been fired because of “a campaign of false allegations.” He also said that while he engaged in “rough sex” and “adventurous forms of sex that included role-play, dominance and submission,” he only participated in sexual practices that were “mutually agreed upon, consensual, and exciting for both partners.”

In a separate Facebook post, he vowed to meet the allegations against him “directly.”

Five days after he was fired from the CBC, Toronto police said they were investigating Ghomeshi after two women had come forward with complaints. On the same day, the CBC issued a memo to staff saying it had seen “graphic evidence” that Ghomeshi had caused physical harm to a woman.

One of the women who contacted police was Lucy DeCoutere, an actress on the TV show “Trailer Park Boys,” who was the first to speak on the record about her alleged experiences with Ghomeshi.

DeCoutere, – the only one of the complainants at Ghomeshi's trial who can be publicly identified – accused the 48-year-old of choking her “to the point she could not breathe” and slapping her “hard three times on the side of her head.”

On Nov. 26, a month after he was fired from the CBC, Ghomeshi was charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking. He was released on $100,000 bail and was ordered to live with his mother.

Jian Ghomeshi
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 1 year ago 1 post

TORONTO – He was a broadcasting star with a wide and loyal following before he became engulfed in a scandal that sparked a nationwide conversation on sexual assault and the issues with reporting it.

Now, more than a year since the allegations against Jian sent shock waves across the country, his highly anticipated trial is set to begin in Toronto on Monday.

Ghomeshi – the former host of CBC radio's popular culture show “Q” – has pleaded not guilty to four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

The judge-alone trial, which is expected to last several weeks, involves three complainants and will be closely watched by many across the country.

“Radio is a very intimate medium and he was going into people's living rooms five days a week,” said Marsha Barber, a journalism professor at Toronto's Ryerson University.

“He was very influential and he had a huge listenership. Anybody who listened to him regularly is going to feel that they have a stake in what happened.”

The controversy around Ghomeshi surfaced on Oct. 24, 2014, when the CBC first said he was taking time off from his duties “to deal with some personal issues.” Two days later, the public broadcaster said it had cut ties with the popular host.

In a lengthy Facebook message posted on the same day, Ghomeshi said he'd been fired because of “a campaign of false allegations.” He also said that while he engaged in “rough sex” and “adventurous forms of sex that included role-play, dominance and submission,” he only participated in sexual practices that were “mutually agreed upon, consensual, and exciting for both partners.”

In a separate Facebook post, he vowed to meet the allegations against him “directly.”

Five days after he was fired from the CBC, Toronto police said they were investigating Ghomeshi after two women had come forward with complaints. On the same day, the CBC issued a memo to staff saying it had seen “graphic evidence” that Ghomeshi had caused physical harm to a woman.

One of the women who contacted police was Lucy DeCoutere, an actress on the TV show “Trailer Park Boys,” who was the first to speak on the record about her alleged experiences with Ghomeshi.

DeCoutere, – the only one of the complainants at Ghomeshi's trial who can be publicly identified – accused the 48-year-old of choking her “to the point she could not breathe” and slapping her “hard three times on the side of her head.”

On Nov. 26, a month after he was fired from the CBC, Ghomeshi was charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking. He was released on $100,000 bail and was ordered to live with his mother.

Red Robinson: Fearless Freddie Signs Off
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 1 year, 11 months ago 1 post

Years ago when I was Program Director at C-FUN someone asked me about Fred Latremouille. My response was “Once in a lifetime someone comes along with great talent, great looks and an all round professional who could do just about everything. But why did he have to come along in my lifetime?” It was a joke because Fred and I were friends and I could get away with it.

Carole and I returned from Palm Springs Thursday night to hundreds of emails with the news that Fred had died. It was a shock… and yet in a way it wasn’t. Fred emailed 10 days before we took off for the desert that he had bad news from his doctor. His liver was damaged and he would have to stop drinking wine or pay the ultimate price. In typical Fred fashion he concluded the email by saying, “But I love my wine!” That last sentence was scary. The habit started years ago when he suffered from various ailments related to his early cancer radiation. It eventually prevented him from playing golf as the post-radiation affected his bones. He never gave up swimming and made a habit of going every day.

When Fred was first diagnosed with cancer, he must have been in his early 20’s. My late son Jeff and I would visit him at his mother’s home in West Vancouver. Fred never forgot the visits. He really took a liking to Jeff and always asked about him.

In the early 60’s Fred and I co-hosted CBC‘s national TV show Let’s Go. It was a great opportunity for the two of us to work together, and we became friends with many on the show including Terry and Susan Jacks, Howie Vickers, Miles Ramsay and so many great and talented people.

In 1993 I decided to do morning radio again, this time on CISL. By that time AM was losing music listeners to FM. Fred was a great competitor on KISS FM and by then he was the number one radio personality in the city.

Read on blog.redrobinson.com/?p=4942

Calgary Radio Icon ”Sugarfoot Anderson” Presented With Canada’s Recording Legacy Award
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 3 years, 3 months ago 1 post

Submitted by Mel Shaw to Cashbox Canada

From 1950 through 1955 Sugarfoot Anderson could be heard six nights a week on CKXL Radio in Calgary. He programmed his own show, playing early R&B, Blues, and Jazz. The program was an influence on the Calgary music scene for five years and inspired musicians and singers with the new music he was playing. Back In the early fifties, radio was the most influential media as television did not start broadcasting in Calgary until 1954. The local newspaper, in a feature story, stated that “Sugarfoot” was the most popular radio host in Calgary.

Ezzert “Sugarfoot” Anderson arrived in Calgary, Alberta in Canada in 1949 to play with the Calgary Stampeders football club and was a very popular player for six years. Along with his football career, Sugarfoot Anderson formed a blues band called “The Bluenotes”. They played locally and were one of the first early R&B bands in the city. Twice they were the lead group at the start of the Stampede Parade raising funds for “The Mile of Dimes.” Sugarfoot's vibrant personality and the blues style of music he performed with his group was not heard on any other radio stations in the city and it gave the Bluenotes a loyal and enthusiastic audience. Over the years, many musicians and singers in Calgary attributed their style and repertoire to music they heard in person and on the Sugarfoot Anderson radio Show.

Barry and John Anderson, Errol Lacroix and SugarfootBarry and John Anderson, Errol Lacroix and SugarfootThe ceremony to honour Sugarfoot was, by his choice, a private affair. It was held for Sugarfoot and members of his family at his home in Calgary on October 26, 2013. The award and congratulatory letters Sugarfoot received were presented at 1:30 pm by the Calgary representative of CRL, Errol Lacroix, who was a well known vocalist in the sixties on local Calgary TV music shows. The reason for the presentation to be held early in the afternoon was because Sugarfoot, who is 93 years of age, didn't want the presentation to interfere with his attending the Stampeders football game with his sons, John and Barry. Sugarfoot is still involved with the Stampeders football team and that in itself is inspiring.

The recognition for “Sugarfoot” has not gone unnoticed as the following letters of congratulations were presented to Sugarfoot with the CRL Award.

Mike Beebe, the Governor of Arkansas, congratulated Ezzeret “Sugarfoot” Anderson (who was born in Nashville, Arkansas) for his career in Canada. He wrote in part “It gives me great pleasure to join your family, many friends and admirers in congratulating you for your many contributions to broadcasting and music. Throughout your career you have been known as a gentleman and an innovator who….as an outstanding radio host on CKXL could be heard six nights a week and also you were a noted musician in your own right bringing the blues and your Southern roots to our friends and neighbors in Canada…Congratulations and thank you for sharing your extraordinary talent and accomplishments. You have brought lasting pride to your native Arkansas.”

Mark Wender, the CEO of the Soulsville Foundation, The Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Stax Music Academy, and the Soulsville Charter School in Memphis wrote “We congratulate you and recognize your many achievements in sports, music and your work in civil rights and equality for persons of color in Canada. The fact that you brought the blues to Canada, performed blues and then played blues on your radio program and refused to attend functions at white only country clubs was inspiring then and remains inspiring today. We know that you, Mr. Ezzrett “Sugarfoot” Anderson… have influenced generations of people.”

Letters of SupportLetters of SupportWendell Wilks. CEO of TVN & Television Producer and Author of The Vision in Television” 2014 wrote in part: “Recognizing Sugarfoot Anderson as an unforgettable icon of culture, media, and music in Western Canada is long overdue . I spent my early days in broadcasting in Alberta. That is where I became aware of the popularity and personality of Sugarfoot Anderson. I never forgot the presence he had. From Calgary I went on to a long career creating television specials with B.B. King, Tina Turner, Dionne Warwick, Michel Legrand, Paul Anka, Tom Jones, and Anne Murray. I will tell you there are many stars who have left an indelible impact on my life and the lives of others. A member tof his group is the gentle giant, “Sugarfoot Anderson,” a true living legend and in my career memories, he is without a doubt a “Star among stars.” Congratulations my dear friend.”

John Harris CEO of the Harris Institute Toronto said: “On behalf of Harris Institute, faculty and students, I congratulate you on being presented Canada's Recording Legacy Award. Your ground breaking contributions as a pioneering radio host on CKXL and as a legendary Calgary Stampeder in the CFL are remarkable achievements.Notable accomplishments in two fields is very rare and you should be proud. At 93 and in good health, you may soon set new records.”

Al Bell, recording industry icon and legendary past president of Stax Records & later Motown Records stated in a letter.”I want to take this opportunity to praise and thank Calgary radio station CKXL for allowing Sugarfoot to broadcast on radio beginning in 1950 and thus expose Canadians to a creative programming mix of the American musical “art” that was born of the African American culture. Sugarfoot's profound commitment to “excellence” as the driving component in his personal life and throughout his professional career set the example and paved the way, and opened the minds and doors of opportunity and acceptance for Al Bell and many other African Americans who chose to follow any of Sugarfoot's professional career pursuits. With sincere thanks, gratitude, and respect I express my profound appreciation personally – and on behalf of both the American Recorded Music and Broadcast Industries – to Canada's Recording Legacy (“CRL”) and its founder, Mel Shaw, for presenting Sugarfoot Anderson, at the age of 93, its Recording Legacy Award of Recognition.

Mel Shaw, Founding President of Canada's Recording Legacy Canada's Recording Legacy Award of Recognition is dedicated to honouring individuals who made an impact in creating the atmosphere for growth of the music industry in radio, television, recording and performance in the past fifty years in Canada.

www.canadasrecordinglegacy.com

Radio Host Art Bell Mysteriously Disappears From SiriusXM
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 3 years, 3 months ago 1 post

The much ballyhooed return of paranormal radio host Art Bell ended in just six weeks.

The master of UFOs, fringe science and conspiracy theory is apparently at odds with SiriusXM over live streaming for his millions of fans.

The 68-year-old co-creator of the hugely successful “Coast to Coast AM” retired from his full-time role of master of the macabre in 2003, after 15 years. Over that span, he went from mainstream talk to a highly successful foray into unexplained phenomena, turning the syndicated juggernaut into the most listened to overnight show in North America.

The late night show's reigns were comfortably taken over by the popular George Noory.

This past July, SiriusXM Satellite Radio announced that Bell would launch a new, live, nightly call-in show, “Art Bell's Dark Matter,” in September.

But since Bell's new program Sept. 16 premiere, there have been, according to Bell on his website, many problems with streaming his show.

“Many thousands of my listeners came on board when it began but they have fallen off because of that reason,” Bell said. “It's a systemic problem. For a caller-driven show like this one, speaking only to people on cell phones in moving vehicles is somewhat difficult.

“The show also is being pirated, oh you have no idea. We are all over the Net right now, from YouTube to a server in England, for example, that's streaming the show live. And because of all this, I have asked SiriusXM to alter their normal method of doing business and allow free streaming for everybody from artbell.com.

“If we get the opportunity to do this streaming, we will kick some serious butt…If not, we may not have a viable situation going forward.”

It appears that SiriusXM has decided not to work things out for Bell, as his website now indicates he posted the following on his Facebook page:

“Sometimes when you are 'all in' you win, sometimes lose. By mutual agreement, Dark Matter will no longer air as of tonight.”

HuffPost's call to SiriuxXM for a comment on this Bell rumor was not returned. When we contacted Noory (pictured at left), the top overnight radio host in the country, for his reaction, he merely said, “No comment.”

Plus, an unnamed source scheduled for an appearance on Bell's show received an email from someone in Bell's camp, which stated: “I regret to inform you (and all upcoming guests) that “Art Bell's Dark Matter” program will no longer be airing live shows effective immediately. I'm really thankful for your efforts with regards to being on the program and I truly apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused you.

“Should events change in the future, I'll be sure to let you know.”

The show had only been on the air since Sept. 16, and tonight's program is a scheduled repeat, after only being on SiriusXM for just six weeks.

And once again, Art Bell's radio voice is quiet.

www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/04/art-bell-resigns-from-sirius-xm-radio_n_4215776.html?utm_hp_ref=weird-news&ir=Weird+News

Why You Don’t Have To Achieve Everything When You’re Young
Group logo for Jock Talk Lounge Jock Talk Lounge 3 years, 3 months ago 1 post

The blog is about Kejia's grandfather in Beijing. Kejia visited the old man recently and discovered something remarkable. We'll let him tell it in his own words, then share a remarkable insight from Kejia himself, who we spoke to overnight. Here's the blog intro:

“Do you sometimes lie awake worrying that you aren't succeeding fast enough? Are you tortured by younger peers who have global businesses, penned acclaimed books and a string of iron-man medals? Do you count down the years until you can no longer make the 30 under 30 list? Take a deep breath. My 92 year old grandpa has some advice for you.”

The blog post continues:

He is a tremendously accomplished individual and considered by many to be a pioneer in biomedical engineering. I visited him in Beijing recently. We were taking an after dinner stroll. I was pestering him for details about his career, looking for tidbits that might help my own. What was he like at my age? How did he work? Is there a secret a routine? He stops me mid-sentence “You know, my career only really took off after I turned 58″.

Hang on, what?

“Yes, I'd say the 10 years between my 60s and 70s were my busiest”.

I was floored. Here is a man who helped revolutionise medical technology and he did it in his twilight years.

Long story short. Kejia's Grandpa's life was interrupted by all sorts of political turmoil in China. But as Kejia explains, this only made him stronger in the end.

“My grandpa had no choice but to wait a long time for his opportunity. It's likely he would have achieved even more had be moved to the West. However, had he missed his moment, I dare say he would still have had a fulfilling life. Without the acclaim and recognition he'd still be the jovial, curious and industrious man I love.

“His advice to me: Don't be in so much of a rush. Be easier on yourself. Comparing yourself to what others are doing is a waste of time. He also adds an old Chinese saying “大器晚成” – A big construction is always completed late.”

So there you have it. Relax. Take a breath. Let this thing come to you rather than despairing that you haven't grabbed it yet.

We asked Kejia if he could tell us about himself and share a few more reflections on the experience of meeting his grandfather. Here's what he said:

“I'm 29, soon to be 30 in January. I stumbled into the web/tech industry by way of physics, an investment bank, charity fundraising and medical research. It feels like I was part of the generation groomed to feel like they could and should achieve everything. I for one have been anxious about living up to this expectation and could see many of my peers felt the same, though it was never talked about.

I moved to the Bay area [San Francisco] last month to join Facebook. Despite some early successes I feel rather unremarkable here, which is a good thing. I wanted to be in a position where I could feel like a rookie and soak up the learning. I do think that the high achievement driven attitude that fuels this area has a negative impact on people's expectations of themselves.”

Is that refreshing or what? This dude works for Facebook, the hub of some of the most creative minds in the world, yet he's not fretting over being smarter and more ahead-of-the-curve than everyone else. He's just doing things in his own time.

Advice we can all heed, don't you think?

Continue the conversation in the comments below or on Twitter with Kejia himself at @Kzhu, @antsharwood and @newscomauHQ. And you can read Kejia's entire blog here.

www.news.com.au/business/worklife/facebook-employees-inspiring-blog-on-why-you-dont-have-to-achieve-everything-when-youre-young/story-e6frfm9r-1226752094569